Selling counterfeit products has become common practice where people flock in person at flea markets, college campuses, salons, libraries, swap meets, and at “private homes parties” where the dealer shows you their products. Amongst the counterfeit products you may suspect would be handbags, clothes, watches, and colognes which have been amusingly renamed such as Essey Miyami instead of Issey Miyake. Scott Wolfson, a spokesman for the Consumer Product Safety Commission, said that it was rare for counterfeit products to be sold in well-known walk-in stores.

Vendors, of course, are still peddling counterfeit products on our city streets. When a reporter was sent to see what he could find in New York, he found himself in an old decrepit building with makeshift doors and walls where a bunch of women sat sewing clothes. In and around that area and on the nearby streets is where the reporter bought some of the fake merchandise that is pictured below.

Selling Counterfeit Products is Booming
The internet has allowed counterfeiters to find partners who can make, market and distribute counterfeit products to an ever broad audience. In January of 2008 the Department of Homeland Security said that 81 percent of all conterfeits in the U.S. came from mainland China.

It is very easy to fool people. Ninety-nine-point-nine percent do not know the difference between the original and a counterfeit product. The fake products in the long run do not wear as well and lack the technology that contributes to comfort. But if the maker is to blame, so is the buyer. One in five Americans knowingly bought a counterfeit product last year mostly because the fake products were easy to find and the price of the original product was seen as unaffordable.

In some instances, the counterfeit products are easily spotted. The printing may be blurred, the embroidery is of low quality and the labels are often missing. But to the casual consumer who has been misled by the marked down prices, the fake products look just fine.

According to consumer reports, China has been pressed by other countries to crack down on counterfeiting. China has a long way to go to deter its counterfeiters judging by the penalties it imposes. For instance local law-enforcement agencies can seize counterfeit products and levy fines. But the fines are so modest that a counterfeiter would not think to raise an eyebrow.

http://hubpages.com/hub/Top-Selling-Counterfeit-Products

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